My Journey to Bella Bella, B.C.

Dear friends,

I’ve been presented with the opportunity to participate in the 2014 Tribal Canoe Journey to Bella Bella. A once in a lifetime opportunity, this journey will cover 550+ miles crossing the waters of the Pacific to the Heiltsuk Nation in the Central Coast region of British Columbia, Canada.

More than 50 Tribes from as far north as Alaska and as far south as Oregon will be participating in this grand event — all culminating in a week long Potlach where we will share our songs, dances, and build new and lasting friendships.

Being on the water has always been an important part of my life — ultimate peace. Last year, after traveling down the Columbia river on the Chinook Canoe Journey, I realized that I’d been neglecting the very thing that gives me deep fulfillment far too long.

I’ve come to understand that a canoe is not simply an object of transport, rather it is a vessel for healing, empowerment, self-determination, youth and community development. For the youth in particular, canoe journey is a metaphor for our journey through life — providing them with the skills needed to live life to their fullest potential away from alcohol and drugs.

So here’s where I need your help:

Our journey will begin on June 22, departing from the Lummi Nation in WA.

This will not be an easy journey. Paddling for 8-13 hours a day is exhausting and painful both physically and mentally. We rely on the lead puller and skipper to guide us through, but every single person in the canoe plays a crucial role. There are dangers both at sea and on land. The cold temperatures, water, and strong winds are a perfect conditions for hypothermia. In addition, we will paddle through and camp in the Great Bear Rainforest — the largest coastal temperate rainforest on Earth and  home to grizzly bears.

Participating in Tribal Canoe Journey will keep me focused on the things I’m most passionate about: working with youth, cross-cultural dialogue, music, adventure, and storytelling.

All money raised will go towards:
1. Waterproof cameras: video and still, batteries, SD cards
2. Waterproof clothing and gear
3. Video software

4. Fees related to journey: ferries, support boats (gasoline),
food, ground crew, travel insurance

Simply put, none of this is possible without your support. I’m reaching out to friends, family, and community. Any donation, big or small is GREATLY appreciated and I will certainly pay it forward ten-fold. If you can help, please click the link below!

Al-Mughamara!
-Carla

http://www.gofundme.com/7mo7qw

 

Conquering That Which Took Me Down.

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As many of you know, 2012 was off to a bad start after embarking on a solo hike in northern Washington that landed me in the emergency room with a broken ankle.

In case you missed it, here’s the story: To Hike Alone.

A Pacific Northwest Trail and the area where “The Cascades Touch The Sea”, Blanchard Mountain, is a 7 mile hike to gorgeous views of the San Juan Islands and Samish Bay. With a 2000 ft. elevation gain and plenty of switchbacks, it’s a considerable climb to the top. It’s also a training point for those wanting to summit Mt. Rainier.

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Determined to conquer this bastard of a mountain and overcome the fear of falling again, I decided to return exactly one year after my accident.

I’ve hiked much tougher terrain in my years, but I wasn’t hiking Blanchard Mountain just for the sake of hiking. Like last year, I was looking to challenge myself both physically and emotionally. Taking a little more precaution this time, I set out to find some hiking support. Initially it was a team of four women, but in the end, it was just me and my great friend, Sarah.

So in 28 degree weather packed with snow in various places, we hiked to the top in just under 4 hours. While the trail is pretty clear and easy at first, it changes quickly and before you know it, you’re climbing over tree stumps and crawling over slippery rocks and boulders. I’d be lying if I said that I wasn’t scared, but I did it anyway. While there are other trails that finger off of Blanchard Mountain waiting for me to explore, at this time in my life, having one successful hike was monumental.

Last year’s adventure was a bust, but not this year. I conquered that which took me down.

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As I stated earlier, I was seeking a physical and emotional challenge. Physically, I was testing my stamina and strength. Emotionally, I was eliminating past negativity, hurts, and mistakes.

Nothing makes me happier or brings me greater peace than being in the outdoors — It’s God’s Country. I know 2013 is THE year of new beginnings filled with love, positivity, renewal, and awesome adventures!

AL-MUGHAMARA!

~ Carlita

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How Education Isn’t Preparing Students For The 21st Century.

A month ago, I was invited to write a blog post for One World Youth Project, an organization based in Washington D.C. linking schools around the world to build generations of discerning, empathetic, and empowered global citizens. Sadly, OWYP suffered budget cuts resulting in the loss of much of the staff and my blog was not published. Many people contributed to it and I would like to share it here.

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I’m  honored to be serving as guest blogger for One World Youth Project. The topic I’m writing about is controversial and remains at the forefront of the educational debate. Let me just state right now that I like to keep it real. There’s no point in beating around the bush when it comes to important topics such as education. So here we go…

How Education Isn’t Preparing Students For The 21st Century.

As an educator with fifteen years experience, I can’t even begin to write the myriad of ways our current education system is failing our youth, but in an effort to keep it short, I decided to take a poll among my colleagues and evaluate the consensus.

Here’s what they said.

“Test prep is short term retention of facts. Regurgitation of facts can’t solve problems. Problem solving requires creating new pathways to move forward.” Brian Harris, Musician – Portland, OR.

With an emphasis on higher test scores and No Child Left Behind, we’ve ironically left so many children behind with their inability to do one thing…think critically. Much of our youth is unable to think outside the box or as my colleague stated above, “create new pathways to move forward.” This is a huge challenge in today’s younger generation. We see it in the classroom, in the job industry, and in everyday life. They struggle to apply skills in new ways, imagine possbilities, or take risks. Their social and academic growth is stunted.

“Students don’t know how to collaborate or live and thrive as a community.” Nathan Olsen, Musician/Writing Specialist at Heritage School – Salem, OR.

Tests are centered on individual performance and so are many school projects. They focus on the me, myself, and I — leaving kids to fend for themselves. It’s no wonder we don’t know how to live and thrive as community. We can’t think like one. I’m all about independent thinking and empowering our children to be strong individuals, but somewhere along the line we’ve created a chasm within our community. This is one of the reasons cross-cultural dialogue is crucial because developing nations understand the concept of community. Whether out of oppression, necessity, or the simple fact that we’re all in this together, they’ve figured it out.

“There is no love of learning.” Lynn DeMarco, Program Coordinator at Low Income Housing – Seattle, WA

A point so true, yet sad because the kids who have no desire to learn likely did at one point, but once the system decided they weren’t learning fast enough or getting the adequate test scores, it killed off any ounce of desire left. I can’t tell you how many students cross my path every year believing they’re stupid thinking they’re done with learning. Seriously, they resign themselves to the belief that they’ll never be as smart as their peers. To them it’s embarrassing enough being alienated in some remedial learning class, so why try?

Learning becomes a competition rather than a yearning.

This is where creativity in the public schools plays an important role. You see, if creativity wasn’t being stifled to the point of extinction, a child might learn to “create” and foster habits of mind that embrace individual strengths and encourage collaborative learning. The fact is, there will always be someone smarter than you. Every single person develops at a different rate and with different gifts, talents, and skill sets. This isn’t a thing of good, bad, or better — we’re meant to be different and we should celebrate that. Furthermore, fostering creativity fosters a love of learning.

“Lack of courageous conversations about racism and white privilege.” Carla Moreno, Educator/Social Media Consultant/Vocal Coach – Salem, OR

Let’s face it, racism still exists. In my opinion we’ve mastered the art of political correctness at best — and that isn’t a good thing either. Where are the conversations about white privilege and institutional racism? Take a look at the disparity in educational and financial resources for people of color and lower income. Consider the conditions of many of our public schools. How about district rules that require kids to travel halfway across the city to attend school because they didn’t make the list to their neighborhood school. I once had a student who took a bus, train, and taxi to attend school. At the end of the day, he spent about 2.5 hours traveling time. By the time he made it to my afternoon music class, he was stressed, angry, and done.

The list goes on and on, these concerns and others aren’t new in the education community. While blogging forums, articles, education journals, and professional development workshops bring these concerns to light, it’s not enough. It’s so important to realize how all this affects our students, teachers, administrators, community, and society as a whole. In all honesty, we can’t throw the blame solely on the education system, it’s our responsibility as global citizens to prepare the next generation for the 21st century.


On Being Able To Say “Farewell, Seattle”

Dear Seattle,

I never thought this day would come. After five years of fun, risky, wonderful, and life changing adventures, the time has come to bid you farewell. It seems like only yesterday I was telling my friends and family in Texas that I was finally going to take the leap of faith and move here to explore new possibilities.

I fell in love with you upon my first visit back in 1999. The stunning views of the Olympic and Cascade mountains were the most magnificent things I’d ever seen. The ice blue color and crashing waves of the Pacific ocean sent chills down my spine. The smell of evergreens, the Space Needle, Mt. Rainier, the ferries, the bookshops, all these things and more left me yearning to be here. So in August of 2007, after 6 months of prayers, planning, and packing I made my new home here in the Emerald City.

Truthfully, other than the job I had lined up, I really didn’t know what else I’d be doing here. Of course, I was met with much resistance from friends and family who thought it preposterous to move 2,000+ miles away and alone. On the other hand, there were those who supported my decision knowing that I was too creative to be stuck in my one teaching job and too adventurous to be stuck living in the South.

I was destined for bigger and better things.

I know I’m only moving down to neighboring Portland, but you’ve played a very important role in my life journey. I take with me some very valuable lessons — lessons I’ll never forget.

I’ve learned how easily we trick ourselves into believing there’s only one “right” way to live life when in fact, it’s only that way within the context of the bubble we live in. Pop that bubble and you quickly realize your way of thinking is a minuscule ideal in the brain of the planet.

I’ve learned to cope with life without my mom after her unexpected death less than a year after moving here. I’ve learned to let go of my guilt, grievances, and deal with the expectations of my Latino community back home.

Among many challenges including, surviving a concussion from a rafting accident and a broken ankle from a solo hike in the woods, I’ve learned that I’m stronger and more resilient than I’ve led myself to believe.

I’ve learned about social justice issues, the state of arts education, and racism in the northwest. I’ve learned that an ultra progressive person can be just as annoying as an ultra conservative one. Just sayin’.

I’ve been introduced to the importance of recycling, new music, new people, walking up hills, bicycling up hills, lots of rain, and of course the coffee culture.

In just five years, I’ve worked as an emcee, a radio dj, a music programmer, a host at a reputable jazz club, a writer, a teacher, a social media consultant, a vocal coach, and even served as an artist-in-service for an initiative set by Congress.

Whew! I’ve been busy.

I’m sure there are some people reading this letter thinking “it’s not like she wouldn’t have these experiences elsewhere” or “there’s nothing unique about her life experiences.” Well, they’re correct, I’m sure I’ll experience many things similar and different somewhere beyond here, but my life experiences need not matter to anyone else other than me. My time here in Seattle is significant because of where I came from, where I am, and where I’m going in my life journey.The fact is, I’ve undergone a major paradigm shift and as a result, I have a better understanding of the greater purpose in being here.

Seattle, my fair city, you’ve served as the place where I would experience growth and transformation. You’ve given me quiet places to pray, breathe, and meditate my life journey. You provided miraculous sunsets over the coast that left me entranced and pondering adventures beyond the horizon. I’ve reinvented myself surrendering to new possibilities and creating endless opportunities. My survival skills have been tested to the core. I’ve learned what true christianity is all about. I’ve learned to work harder, love stronger, and enjoy each day as if it were the last. Most importantly, you’ve introduced me to the man I love and the reason I’m relocating to Portland.

My life is enriched simply because I took the risk — and for that I’m grateful.

Thank you, dearest Seattle. You hold a special place in my heart. I will visit and return to those quiet places that carried me through many life circumstances, but for now I must I bid you a adieu.

Until next time.

Introducing A New Career and Cultivated Growth!

It should be of no surprise that I’m always searching for the next adventure in my life creating new possibilities and expanding my horizons. So I’m proud to be launching a new career honing in on my talents and expertise in vocal coaching, writing, and social media. 

While I have been consulting various people, organizations, and companies throughout the last two years, my very first client is my business and personal coach, Garren Katz. Founder of Cultivated Growth, He is a graduate of the Accomplishment Coaching training program and a member of the International Coach Federation.

Garren was one of the first people I befriended when I moved out to Seattle in 2007. I’ve always been inspired by his jolly spirit, loyal friendship, and caring personality. Not only does he have entrepreneurial savvy he also has a gift for supporting and guiding people in realizing their dreams and cultivating their life’s desire.

When he expressed an interest in hiring me as his social media consultant, I was more than honored…I was challenged. For those of you who know me well, you know that I thrive on challenges!

As I help Garren’s business grow, my role as social media consultant is to create original and engaging copy for his website, proofread his blog posts, link and manage various social media platforms including Google+, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Yelp to name a few. 

It’s a work in progress and with each technological innovation and social media trend, I will be on top of keeping Garren’s business up to par, allowing his clients access to his expertise as quickly and efficiently as possible.

So here’s to new adventures, life, and cultivated growth!

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To Hike Alone

Fall seven times, stand up eight. ~Japanese Proverb

One of my favorite things about living in the Pacific Northwest is the scenery. The mountains, the skies, the Puget Sound, all these things and more provide the perfect backdrop to my life. As a traveler and adventurer, I always stay busy hiking or kayaking around the area. 

Just the other day, I decided to reunite with nature and go for a jaunt on Blanchard Mountain in northern Washington. According to my hiking guidebook, the giant boulders, bat caves and fabulous views on Oyster Dome are well worth the steep 6.5 mile hike. Just what I needed to test my endurance.

After a 1.5 hour drive, I parked my car and started my route on the Pacific Northwest Trail just off State Route 11 (Chuckanut Drive). There were a few people along the trail, but for the most part, it was a pleasant and quiet hike. Even though it wasn’t snowing, the 1,900 foot elevation gain certainly made it cold as I neared the top. After a few hours, I decided to take a break near an ice-age interpretive sign by the Talus Trail junction. I climbed on top a boulder to take some photos and greeted a young couple doing the same – their names, Christina and Anthony.

As they went on their way, I sat by myself enjoying the view. I didn’t stay too long as I was losing light and it was getting colder. It was about 10 minutes later when I started my way down off the boulder that I took one step to the left and SNAP! I fell in a split position with my right foot bent 90 degrees at the ankle. The snap was loud and it hurt like hell. I started to yell for help. Fortunately, Christina and Anthony hadn’t gotten too far away and responded. When they arrived, they climbed back on the boulder and managed to get me down, but that was as far as I would go. Walking myself out of there was out of the question.

This was the last thing I needed.

Stranded on a mountain, unable to move. A person’s worst nightmare.

There were a million things running through my mind.

It was rather fortuitous that Christina was carrying a GPS device. She later told me that she was conducting a project for her university class on satellite tracking. Divine intervention, huh? We both tried using our phones to call 911, but with spotty coverage and our batteries draining it was becoming increasingly difficult, so in one short exchange, Christina managed to give the GPS coordinates to a 911 responder.

Anthony, worried about how badly I was shaking, started back down the trail to get some blankets from his car. Christina stayed with me watching over the phones and keeping my mind off the pain with light conversation. It was well over an hour before the first crew made it to us. They bandaged my ankle and started to build a fire. The second crew brought a litter (rescue basket) strapped me inside, and placed my ankle in a vacuum splint. The third crew, which consisted of 15 volunteer firefighters and EMT’s were the people who did the actual grunt work.

  

Let me tell ya’ these guys worked fast!

By this point I was going into shock, and that together with the onset of hypothermia was not a good combination. They placed heat packs underneath my armpits and wrapped me in a waterproof down sleeping bag. After surveying the terrain and calculating how much rope they needed to belay me down the first part of the trail, we started our descent off the mountain. There was a “brake team” in the back and “survey team” in the front, along with the team that carried me on the sides. They took turns, changed positions, rested, and swapped between rope and wheel–all this with headlamps and night-vision goggles.

It was quite the task force and a comical bunch too! Cracking jokes and making fun of the situation at my expense was the best way to keep my mind off the situation, I’m sure. 🙂 When they found out I was alone and managing rather calmly despite the excruciating pain, they called me a “badass!” – A compliment in my book! 😀

Six hours later, around 8 p.m. after the team warded off a bear somewhere in there, I reunited with the first crew again and shuttled in an ambulance to Skagit Valley Hospital. A series of X-rays confirmed that I did indeed break my ankle. An oblique break in the fibula, to be exact. I’ll be out for the next six weeks with a follow up in two weeks to determine if I’ll need surgery.

It’s hard to get around on crutches and as usual, you never realize just how much you take your body for granted until you can’t use it properly. As for me, not being able to walk has certainly made a difference in my daily functions and I’m not even gonna’ get started on the crazy side effects of Vicodin! I’m on my own most days, but thankful for the friends and strangers who’ve sacrificed their time helping me out — just proof of the people worth keeping in your life.

When I think back on it all, I laugh at how I manage to find myself in such predicaments. This experience hasn’t discouraged me from hiking solo again…I mean, this is what I do! I gotta’ live life! Although this does mean I won’t be wearing my Manolo Blahniks for a while.

Bummer.